MA car owners win Right to Repair + Council of the EU continues attack on encryption | Tech for the People Today – November 9, 2020

MA car owners win Right to Repair + Council of the EU continues attack on encryption | Tech for the People Today – November 9, 2020

Voters in Massachusetts passed Question 1, the “Right to Repair Law” Vehicle Data Access Requirement by a 3-1 vote last Tuesday. The law requires that car manufacturers standardize the way data from cars, so that the data can be shared with the owner and with independent repair shops – not just the dealer. Unfortunately, the law goes into effect for model year 2022, and while there are also some privacy concerns in terms of access to this system, it’s a statement that that MA voters should to be able to repair their cars when and where they want.

The Council of the European Union has published a Draft Council Resolution on Encryption. While non-binding even if it passes on a November 25 approval vote, the resolution [PDF link] continues the war on encryption by including language like, “Competent authorities must be able to access data in a lawful and targeted manner.” If this sounds familiar, it should: It echoes calls by the US, UK, Australian and other governments across the world to give law enforcement backdoor access to encrypted data – defeating the point of encryption entirely. The Matrix.org Foundation has a good response to it.

Zoom and the Federal Trade Commission came to a settlement over Zoom’s wrongful claims of offering end-to-end encryption. When the COVID-19 pandemic moved many meetings to Zoom and other services, security professionals noted that Zoom’s E2EE wasn’t actually that. Since then, Zoom has started rolling out real E2EE. Under the settlement, Zoom will implement a vulnerability management program and take other steps to secure the data of its users.